Usage dictionary

This is the place to find general advice on the ways we use and spell certain words (add-in rather than extension, for example), and grammatical questions like the difference between active and passive voice.

A

abbreviations and acronyms
The first time you use an abbreviation or acronym in a page, write it in full, and then refer to it by its initials. For example, Team Foundation Server (TFS). You can then use the abbreviation afterwards (but don’t include the acronym if you’re not going to use it again later in the page).
          Don’t use periods in abbreviations, either. For example, write TFS, not T.F.S. and, if the acronym is better understood than its expansion, don’t spell it out. A good example is to write DNS rather than Domain Name System (DNS).
-able
         
When you add able to a word ending in e, drop the e unless the word ends with a soft c, as in peace, or a soft g as in change.          
For example, peaceable and changeable vs sizable and upgradable.
active vs passive voice
Try using the active voice when it fits because it’s easier to read.
              Active voice: SQL Source Control polls the database.
              Passive voice: The database is polled by SQL Source Control.
add-ins
         
The SQL Server Management Studio term for plug-ins. Note that Visual Studio plug-ins are called extensions.
afterward
         
Not afterwards.
allow, enable, let
         
Try to avoid using allow, enable, or let by writing sentences that use you can and make the reader the subject.
              Compare: You can write SQL faster with SQL Prompt.
              With: SQL Prompt allows you to write SQL faster.
              Or: SQL Prompt enables you to write SQL faster.
              Or: SQL Prompt lets you write SQL faster.
alpha
When software development is at the alpha stage, it’s referred to as alpha not Alpha.
Amazon Web Services
The name of a product, so capitalized.
American English
We use American English because it’s the form most of our users are familiar with. The exceptions are job ads and marketing material like flyers aimed at the UK market.
              The most common Americanism is to use ize instead of ise at the end of words like synchronize, customize, and organize.
              Look out too for words ending in our where the u is omitted in the American form. For example, color and behavior.
ampersand (&)
         
Write and instead, unless you’re writing a command name, an onscreen element, a document title that uses the character, or a tweet where room is limited.
analog
         
Not analogue.
application
         
When talking generically about software, use application instead of program, tool, etc. For example, Close the application.
Application Lifecycle Management
         
Often used when explaining what Database Lifecycle Management is. Always spell out in full first, followed by (ALM), and then use the acronym ALM afterwards.
assure vs ensure vs insure
People sometimes use these interchangeably, so for clarity and consistency, use them as follows:
              Assure means to state positively and remove doubt.
              Ensure means to make sure or guarantee.
              Insure means to provide insurance.
audience
         
Write users instead.
auto vs auto-
         
When used as a prefix, only use a hyphen when the following word begins with a vowel. For example, autosave vs auto-update.
Azure Data Warehouse
The name of a product, so capitalized.

B

back-end vs back end
         
In general, don’t use the hyphen and try to think of a more specific term like server, database, or network instead.
              If used as an adjective, it’s hyphenated. For example, It’s important to consider how this will affect back-end performance issues.
backlog
One word.
backup vs back up
         
When it’s a noun or adjective, it’s backup. For example, Restore a database backup.
              When it’s a verb, it’s back up. For example, Back up your database.
backward
         
Use instead of backwards.
beta
When software development is at the beta stage, it’s referred to as beta not Beta.
big data
Lowercase.
bits vs bytes
         
It’s easy to confuse bits with bytes.
              In computer terminology, a bit is a binary value of either one or zero. One kilobit is 1,000 bits. Similarly, one megabit = 1,000,000 bits and is abbreviated as 1 Mb.
              Network connection speeds are typically measured in megabits and gigabits per second, and are written in the format: 54 Mbps or 1 Gbps.
              A byte is a sequence of eight bits. One megabyte is equal to 1,000,000 bytes and is abbreviated as 1 MB.
              Hard disks, computer memories, and file sizes are measured in kilobytes, megabytes, and gigabytes (and terabytes and petabytes as well), and are written in the format: 100 MB.
              So use bits, as in Kbps, Mbps and Gbps, when talking about download speeds.
              Use bytes, as in KB, MB, GB, TB, and PB, when talking about file sizes.
              Use only Mb and MB, etc, as the abbreviations and don’t capitalize words like megabit and megabyte.
Boolean
         
Uppercase b.
braces vs brackets
         
The term for the { } symbols is braces, not curly brackets.
              The term for the [ ] symbols is brackets not square brackets.
              The term for the < > symbols is angle brackets not brackets.
browser-based
With the hyphen.
bug-tracking system
With the hyphen.

C

C#
         
Not c#, C Sharp, etc.
callout vs call out
         
When it’s a noun or adjective, it’s one word. For example, When you use a callout, keep it brief.
              When it’s a verb, it’s two words. For example, It’s good practice to call out any new features in the introduction.
canceled, canceling
         
One l, but spell cancellation with two l’s.
capitals
         
Only use uppercase for proper names like Redgate, SQL Compare, Visual Studio, and job titles. Use lowercase for most things, including:
  • sentences following colons or semicolons
  • headings
  • button labels
  • menu options
catalog
         
Not catalogue.
caveats
         
Caveats can lead to awkward grammar, so try and avoid them by writing You can, for example, rather than You may be able to.
check-in vs check in
         
When it’s a noun or adjective, it’s check-in. For example, See your last check-in.
              When it’s a verb, it’s check in. For example, Check in your changes.
checkout vs check out
         
When it’s a noun or adjective, it’s checkout. For example, Go to Checkout.
              When it’s a verb, it’s check out. For example, Check out your order.
client-side vs client side
         
The hyphen is not necessary in normal use. For example, The application requests large amounts of data and then filters it on the client side.
              When the phrase is used as an adjective, however, include it. For example, Discover a client-side glimpse of what’s going on in your server.
cloud
Lowercase, because it’s not a proper noun or a product that belongs to someone.
co-
         
In general, avoid hyphenating words beginning with co unless it will cause confusion.
codebase
One word.
collective nouns
         
Redgate is a collective noun, but is referred to as a singular entity. For example, write Redgate is… not Redgate are…. The same goes for Microsoft and all other companies or organizations.
colons
Use to introduce an image or example. In a sentence, don't capitalize after a colon: write it in lowercase, like this.
columnstore index
This is a type of index introduced in SQL Server 2012. Note that no capitals are required unless it starts a sentence.
command-line vs command line
         
When the phrase is used as a noun, no hyphen is required. For example, DLM Automation performs database-specific tasks through the command line.
              When the phrase is used as an adjective, include the hyphen. For example, As a command-line tool….
compare to vs compare with
         
Compare to is used to highlight the similarities between dissimilar items. For example, Users have compared SQL Prompt to a Formula 1 car.
              Compare with is used to highlight the similarities or differences between similar items. For example, Compared with IntelliSense, SQL Prompt is indeed a Formula 1 car.
comprise
         
Use a word like include or contain instead.
context-sensitive
With the hyphen.
continuous integration
This is lowercase but the acronym, CI, is uppercase.
contractions
         
Contractions like it’s, can’t, don't, and haven’t simplify and relax prose, and make it friendlier, so use them where it fits the style you’re aiming for.
customer
         
Unless it’s required in a sales context or would cause repetition, write user instead. For example: We understand installing updates frequently is impractical for some users.

D

data
         
Data is now regarded as a singular noun, so write Data is lost, for example, not Data are lost.
Database Administrator
Note the capitals. Spell out in full at the first mention, followed by (DBA), and then use the acronym DBA afterwards.
Database Lifecycle Management
Note the capitals. Spell out in full at the first mention, followed by (DLM), and then use the acronym DLM afterwards.
datacenter vs data center
         
Note the American spelling. Use two words except in product names like Microsoft Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Edition.
dates
         
To avoid confusion, dates are spelled out in full, rather than using numbers like 06/06/16. For example, June 6th, 2016.
datum
         
This is the original singular noun of data. It’s not used now because it causes confusion. Use data instead.
dependencies
When writing about databases dependencies, don't use words like dependent and depending. They look too similar and it's easy to confuse yourself (and the reader).
              Instead, use the verb ‘to reference’. For example, Object A references object B. The same goes for multiple objects: Object Q references objects R and S, and is referenced by objects T, U, and V.
Sometimes this makes sentences slightly awkward, but it's better to be slightly awkward and clear than succinct and incomprehensible.
deprecated
         
Used to describe an application or feature that is being phased out. Use deprecated when talking to a technical audience, but for a general audience use obsolete or another appropriate word.
desire vs want vs need
         
Don’t use desire. Use want when the user has a choice of actions. Use need where there is a requirement or obligation.
domain
         
Be specific about the context when using domain.
In database design, a domain is the set of valid values for a particular attribute.
In Windows, a domain is a collection of computers sharing a common database and security policy.
On the internet, a domain is the part of the address immediately before and after the dot. For example, red-gate.com.
double-click
With the hyphen.
downtime
One word.
drop-down menu
With the hyphen.

E

earlier (version numbers)
         
For example, SQL Source Control 5.1 or earlier, not SQL Source Control 5.1 or older.
eBook
Note the capital and the absence of a hyphen.
eg
         
The abbreviation for the Latin phrase meaning for example. Use for example instead, unless space is limited in tooltips or embedded help. In this case, use eg without periods, and include a comma before and after it.
email
No hyphen, no capital.
email address
         
Unless you need to avoid ambiguity, just write email.
emoticons
We don’t use them in any Redgate communications, including Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.
enable
See 'allow, enable, let'.
encounter, experience
         
It's usually simpler to write have instead. For example: If you still have problems, contact Redgate support.
end-user vs user
         
User or you is friendlier so don’t write end-user unless it would confuse the meaning you want to convey.
ensure
See 'assure vs ensure vs insure'.
entitled
         
Use titled, named, or called instead.
et al.
         
The abbreviation of the Latin phrase meaning and others. Use and others instead unless it’s in the context of a text reference citation of three or more authors.
etc
         
The abbreviation for the Latin phrase meaning and the rest. When used, place a comma before it and a comma after it, unless it’s the end of a sentence, in which case use a period.
exclamation marks (!)
Try not to use them. They imply shouting rather than talking and can, in almost every instance, be removed without changing the intent of the text.
extension
         
Not file extension or file name extension. Don't capitalize extensions preceded by a period. For example, write .csv, .html, .sql, etc.
              If you use an extension as the last word in a sentence, don't follow it with a period. For example, write Download as a .chm
              Do, however, capitalize file types when you're not writing them as extensions. For example, HTML file, SQL file, etc.
              The exception is PDF, which has become its own word, as in Available as a PDF. For this reason, it’s fine to write PDFs plural, rather than PDF files.
extensions
         
Visual Studio plug-ins are called extensions, but note that SQL Server Management Studio plug-ins are called add-ins.

F

failover vs fail over
         
When it’s a noun, it’s failover. For example, failover cluster.
              When it’s a verb, it’s fail over. For example, There was a database fail over.
fewer vs less
         
Use fewer when referring to a countable number of items. For example, Fewer than 12 servers were now being monitored.
              Use less to refer to a mass amount, value, or degree. For example, The new data center had less floorspace.
finalize
         
Use finish or complete instead.
firewall
One word, no capital, no hyphen.
first-time
         
Only hyphenate when used as an adjective. For example, first-time user, first-time comparison, etc.
flyer
         
Many US style guides recommend flier, but flyer is the more common American spelling.
focused, focusing
         
One s, not focussed or focussing.
free
         
Not for free. For example, SQL Search is available free.
front-end vs front end
         
The hyphen is not necessary in normal use. For example, Understanding how async actually works at the front end is no mean feat.
              When the phrase is used as an adjective, however, include it. For example, It’s important to consider front-end performance issues.

G

gender
         
Our software is used by men and women, and our writing should reflect that. Never say his to cover both men and women – instead use plural words like their. For example, Users can link their database to their application version control.
              To counter the predominantly male language of software and database development, it's also nice to include female names in screenshots, worked examples, and so on. For example, Amanda creates a table in her database and goes to the Commit changes tab.
Git
Uppercase G.
GitHub
No hyphen. Note the capitals.

H

host name
Two words.
hover over
         
Write move the mouse over instead.
how-to vs how to
         
Use the hyphen when used as an adjective. For example, Find out in this how-to book….

I

i.e.
         
The abbreviation for the Latin phrase meaning that is. Use that is instead.
impact
         
This is a noun, not a verb. Things have an impact, they don’t impact things (the verb you’re looking for is affect).
industry-standard
With the hyphen.
In-Memory vs in-memory
         
An in-memory database relies on main memory for data storage. When talked about in general, it’s lowercase. When mentioned as a feature of SQL Server 2014 onwards, it’s capitalized, as in SQL Server In-Memory.
insure
See 'assure vs ensure vs insure'.
internet
         
With a lowercase i.
Internet of Things
         
Note the capitals. The acronym is IoT.
into vs in to
         
Into is a preposition used to demonstrate movement, action or change. For example, Log into your Redgate account.
              In to is the adverb in followed by the preposition to. They’re not related and just happen to fit together in a sentence sometimes. For example, The DBA came in to monitor the server.
              A neat trick for working out which to use is to remember that in to is generally short for in order to.
              Log in order to your Redgate account doesn’t work.
              The DBA came in order to monitor the server does work.
its vs it’s
It’s easy to get confused here.
              Its is the possessive form. For example, A free 30-day trial is one of its attractions.
              It’s is the contraction of it is. For example, It’s easy to download it and try it.

J

Java, JavaScript
Uppercase j and s.
job titles
Capitalized. For example, Software Developer, not software developer.
join
         
In the database world, join refers to a relationship between fields in different tables. Try not to use it elsewhere to avoid confusion.

K

kilobit, megabit, gigabit, etc
The term used in relation to network connection speeds.
              The abbreviation is Kb, Mb, Gb, etc, when talking about size and Mbps (megabits per second) when talking about speed.
              When abbreviated, insert a space between the number and the term. For example, 54 Mbps.
Don’t capitalize when the word is spelled out.
See also 'bits vs bytes'.
kilobyte, megabyte, gigabyte, etc
The term used in relation to file sizes.
The abbreviation is KB (kilobyte), MB (megabyte), GB (gigabyte), TB (terabyte), PB (petabyte), etc.
When abbreviated, insert a space between the number and the term. For example, 100 MB.
Don’t capitalize when the word is spelled out.
See also 'bits vs bytes'.

L

label, labeled, labeling
         
Use one l.
left-hand, right-hand
         
Hyphenate when used as an adjective. For example, The right-hand column contains the data you need.
less vs fewer
         
Use less to refer to a mass amount, value, or degree. For example, The new data center had less floorspace.
              Use fewer when referring to a countable number of items. For example, Fewer than 12 servers were now being monitored.
let
See 'allow, enable, let'.
license
         
Not licence. This goes for both nouns and verbs.
lifecycle
         
One word. Capitalized when used in phrases like Database Lifecycle Management.
login vs log in
         
When it’s a noun or adjective, it’s login. For example, I've forgotten my login details.
              When it’s a verb, it’s log in. For example, To log in, enter your Redgate ID.
              Use logout and log out in the same way, and avoid other forms such as log on/off, sign in/out, sign on/off.

M

metadata
One word.
Microsoft data platform
This is the broad area within which Redgate develops software. Note that it’s not capitalized as in Microsoft Data Platform, because that would imply Microsoft has a product or suite of products that it sells.
migration script
         
Not migrations script. No caps.
mission-critical vs mission critical
         
The hyphen is not necessary in normal usage, but when the phrase is used as an adjective, include it. For example, It was a mission-critical situation.
              Also try using critical by itself. If omitting the word mission makes no difference to the meaning you want to convey, leave it out to avoid hyperbole.
monospace type
Use monospace type when you want to include a SQL command, some code, or script in normal text, or when you're quoting from text in an XML or SQL file, or a command line.
more than vs over
         
Use more than to refer to quantifiable figures and amounts. Use over to refer to a spatial relationship, or in a comparison when more has already been used and you want to avoid repetition.
MS-DOS
         
Note the hyphen and capitalization. Never use DOS by itself when referring to the Microsoft system.
multi- vs multi
         
When used as a prefix, only use a hyphen when the following word begins with i. For example, multitasking vs multi-item.
           
MVP
This is the acronym for the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional award. The audience we talk to are generally familiar with it, so there’s no need to spell it out. It’s useful to mention it when we introduce MVPs like Steve Jones and Grant Fritchey.
         

N

n/a
Lowercase.
need vs want vs desire
         
Use need where there is a requirement or obligation. Use want when the user has a choice of actions. Don’t use desire.
.NET
         
Always precede with a period and use capitals. Try not starting or ending a sentence with .NET to avoid confusion.

O

no one
No hyphen.
numbers
Spell as words from one to ten. After that, use digits. If you have both in the same sentence, only use digits.
              When combining numbers with words, as in 14-day, 28-day, 32-bit, 64-bit, etc, use a hyphen.
Object Explorer
Note the capitalization.
of
         
Don’t use of after another preposition. For example, off of, or outside of.
online
No hyphen.
on-screen
With hyphen.
open source
No hyphen, no capitals.
over vs more than
         
Use more than to refer to quantifiable figures and amounts. Use over to refer to a spatial relationship, or in a comparison when more has already been used.
overly
         
Use over instead, as in overcomplex, not overly complex. If you’re unconvinced, use too.
Oxford comma
         
An Oxford (or serial) comma is the final comma in a list of things. For example, SQL Compare, SQL Source Control, and SQL Prompt.
              It's not always necessary but it can prevent misunderstandings. Compare I dedicate this book to my parents, Martin Amis, and J K Rowling, with I dedicate this book to my parents, Martin Amis and J K Rowling.

P

percent vs per cent vs %
         
There’s no need to spell it out in either of the popular forms. Instead, use the % symbol with no space after the numeral. For example, 71% of Fortune 100 companies use Redgate SQL Compare.
plurals
         
To turn an acronym or abbreviation into a plural, add an s but no apostrophe. For example, DBAs.
              To turn a letter or symbol into a plural, add an apostrophe and an s. For example, t’s and +’s.
              To turn a number into a plural, add an s. For example, 1990s.
pre-
         
Don’t hyphenate words using the pre prefix, unless it would cause confusion or is followed by a proper noun. For example, pre-engineered, or pre-C++.
plug-ins
         
With hyphen, but note that SQL Server Management Studio plug-ins are called add-ins and Visual Studio plug-ins are called extensions.
program
         
Not programme (but remember, as a noun, we generally prefer application anyway).
PS
No periods (in this or any other acronym).

Q

quality
         
Don’t use quality by itself as an adjective. Instead, include a modifier, which also means a hyphen is required. For example, high-quality or professional-quality.

R

re-
         
Use a hyphen when followed by the vowel e. For example, re-entry, re-examine.
              Don’t use a hyphen when followed by the vowels a, i, o or u, or any consonant. For example, reinstall, reassemble, reorder, reread, reuse<, rebuild, retry.
The exception is where confusion with another word would arise. For example, re-cover/recover, re-creation/recreation, re-form/reform, re-sent/resent, re-run/rerun.
read-only
With the hyphen.
real-time vs real time
         
The hyphen is not necessary in normal language, but when the phrase is used as an adjective, use it. For example, In situations like this, you need a real-time monitoring tool like SQL Monitor.
Red Gate Software
         
The legal name of the company remains Red Gate Software, so this is how the company is referred to in legal documentation and copyright notices. In every other instance, used Redgate Software.
Redgate Software
When writing for external audiences outside the Redgate websites, write Redgate Software in full at the first mention and then use Redgate by itself in later mentions. Redgate is a collective noun, but is referred to as a singular entity. For example, write Redgate is… not Redgate are…
Redgate products
Redgate has a broad portfolio of products and is now focusing on those that support the Microsoft data platform.
              Acronyms are not used for most Redgate products, and product names are always used in full. SQL Source Control, for example, is never referred to in communications for external audiences as SOC, SSC, or Source Control.
              The only exceptions are ANTS Performance Profiler and ANTS Memory Profiler, which can be referred to as APP and AMP following the first mention.
              When writing for external audiences outside the Redgate websites, precede every product name with Redgate at the first mention.
Redgate support
         
Note support is not capitalized.
right-click
         
Use the hyphen when the words are used as a verb. For example, Right-click the file. Note that it doesn't need on after it. Write Right-click the object, for example, not Right-click on the object.
roadmap
One word.
runs vs runs on
         
A computer runs an operating system. A program runs on an operating system.
run time, runtime, run-time
         
Run time is the time during which an application is running.
              A runtime is an environment required to run programs which are not compiled to machine language.
              The adjective run-time describes a thing occurring or relevant at runtime.

S

scalable, scalability
         
Not scaleable or scaleability.
screenshot
One word. Use instead of alternatives like screengrab.
scrollbar
One word, no hyphen.
SDK
         
The abbreviation for software development kit, but note it’s in lowercase for the spelled out version, unless it’s part of a product name.
see
         
Use the word see, rather than the words refer to.
serial comma
See 'Oxford comma'.
server
         
Lowercase, unless you’re talking about the Microsoft product SQL Server, which is uppercase. For example, The server SQL Server is installed on….
server-side
         
Hyphenate when used as an adjective. For example, When you need a server-side solution….
setup vs set up
         
When it’s a noun or adjective, it’s setup. For example, Follow the setup instructions.
              When it’s a verb, it’s set up. For example, Set up the database comparison.
slashes
         
Use for combinations like client/server, not as a substitute for or. Use spaces when there are multiple words on at least one side of the slash. For example, Database Administrator / Database Developer.
software development kit
See 'SDK'.
spacing after a period
Use a single space, not double.
SQL Server
         
Use capitals as shown. For example, The base monitor is a Windows service that monitors your SQL Servers.
SQL Servers means instances of SQL Server, while the computer that SQL Server is installed on is just a server.
SQL Server Database Project
Note the capitalization.
SQL Server Management Studio
         
Note the capitalization. Write in full followed by (SSMS) at the first mention, and then use the acronym SSMS in further mentions. Don’t refer to it as Management Studio on its own.
SQL tools
Not a product name, so tool is lowercase.
startup vs start up
         
When it’s a noun or adjective, it’s startup. For example, Check for updates on startup.
              When it’s a verb it’s start up. For example, To start up a computer.
sub-
         
Don’t hyphenate words that begin with sub. Instead, write subfolder, subhead, subsection, etc.
support
         
No caps, even when referring to Redgate support. For example, Contact Redgate support.
sync, synced, syncing
         
Not synch, synched, or synching.

T

table-valued function
With hyphen.
taskbar
One word, lowercase.
Team Foundation Server
         
Note the capitalization. Write in full followed by (TFS) at the first mention, and then use the acronym TFS in further mentions.
that vs which
         
That defines. Which gives extra information, often in a clause enclosed by commas or brackets. Don’t use that or which to refer to a person. Use who instead. See 'who vs that'.
Sentence Meaning
The product logos, which have just been redesigned, are clean and informative. All the products logos were redesigned. They’re clean and informative.
The product logos that were redesigned are clean and informative. Only some of the product logos were redesigned. Unlike the old ones, the new logos are clean and informative.
that, which, of
These words can often, but not always, be removed without losing meaning or clarity.
              Consider, for example, Choose the database that you want to source control, or, Select all of the objects.
third-party vs third party
         
When it’s a noun, it’s third party. For example, There was no third party involved.
              When it’s an adjective, it’s hyphenated. For example, You can also use some third-party tools.
timeline
One word.
time-out
With the hyphen.
timestamp
One word.
titled
         
Not entitled.
tooling
         
Use tools instead.
toolkit
One word.
tooltip
One word.
toward
         
Not towards.

U

UK, USA
Use as abbreviations for the United Kingdom and the United States, without periods.
UK-based
With the hyphen.
update vs upgrade
         
Updates are minor releases. For example, SQL Monitor 5.1 to 5.2.
              Upgrades are major releases. For example, SQL Monitor 4 to 5.
upgradable
         
Not upgradeable.
up-to-date vs up to date
         
When used as a noun, there are no hyphens. For example, The drivers are up to date.
              When it’s an adjective, it’s hyphenated. For example: You can now download the up-to-date drivers.
uptime
One word.
upward
         
Not upwards.
user
         
The best generic term for a user of our products, as opposed to a term like end-user or customer. Try to use it unless it would confuse the meaning you want to convey.
user base
Two words, no hyphen.
user-defined
With the hyphen.
user-friendly
With the hyphen.
username
Use one word when referring to the name part of a login.

V

Visual Studio
         
Note the capitalization. Write in full followed by (VS) at the first mention, and then use the acronym VS in further mentions.

W

want vs need vs desire
         
Use want when the user has a choice of actions. Use need where there is a requirement or obligation. Don’t use desire.
we and us
         
It’s okay to write we or us to mean Redgate, especially as it means we avoid the passive voice. Use We recommend you do X, for example, not You are recommended to do X.
web
No capital, as with other derived words or phrases like website or web address.
whilst
         
Use while instead.
white paper
Two words.
white space
Two words, no hyphen.
who vs. that
         
Use who not that in references to people. For example, For developers who prefer state-based migrations.
WinForms
With capitals.

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